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Help Matt plan a vacation in New York City. I’ve been dealing with lot of job stress lately and have over a month of time-off saved up, so my boss suggested I take a vacation in February. Since I’m contemplating trying to find a job in New York City, I thought it might be useful to check out the city and see if I could actually stand to live there. Problem is, I’ve never planned a vacation before and don’t know the first thing about the area. Any and all feedback and suggestions are welcome…

7 responses so far (Respond)

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Two online resources: timeoutny.com and notfortourists.com.

Also, Time Out NY has a weekly rag it puts out that one can subscribe to: may be worth it just to get a heads-up on goings-on.

Finally, when I’m in NY, I actually like to stay at the YMCA around the block from the Lincoln Center. It’s low-brow… but I love the clientele and who needs a fab-o place to _sleep_?

vis10n | 4 Dec 2002
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Oh… and I almost forgot a thread over at Kottke that should prove indispensible.

vis10n | 4 Dec 2002
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John Hiler at Microcontent News (www.microcontentnews.com) has started a CityBlogs blog which is attempting to become an online tourist guide (updated). Might be worth a visit before you go.

Morrie | 4 Dec 2002
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I second the comment on the Kottke thread. It’s good if you intend to try to live like a native for a bit.

The big problem with vacationing in the city is that most hotels are heart-stoppingly expensive, and eating out for every meal will also mount up. It might not be the most comfortable solution, but see if you can cajole a friend into giving you his couch for a few nights.

Beyond that — Bleecker St. is a glorious place to window-shop in its north-south section, and even better for shopping and eating in its east-west section. (I can show you the difference.) Blind Tiger is the best place for the adventurous drinker. The Duplex is the best piano bar for pop and Don’t Tell Mama’s is the best one for show tunes. The Algonquin Hotel has a stunning lobby where they serve wine and h’ors d’oevres. And there’s no better way to waste an afternoon than going to Macy’s at Herald Square and riding the original wooden escalators.

Mike B | 5 Dec 2002
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On the couch thang: when I go, and am lucky enough to have cohorts in-town. I offer them about a quarter of what a hotel would cost me to use their couch, and I cook them dinner one night (I used to cater, and am a damn-fine cook… so that does mean something). I’d suggest something similar: $200 for a couch will save you bundles, and will probably considerably improve their short-term liquidity. And if you can’t cook, you could always offer to detail their computer or something useful.

Speaking of great places in NYC… Bond St is the best sushi I’ve ever had (and better be for an $80 lunch).

vis10n | 5 Dec 2002
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It really can be financially prohibitive to get a hotel room in NYC, especially if you’re travelling alone. A $100/night room is slightly expensive for two people, but painfully so for one person. Go with the Y, or some other youth hostel, if you’re not incredibly flush.

If you like museums, New York is the land of plenty. Food is also a big part of enjoying the city. Eating out in Chinatown is an education in Asian food, and can be very affordable, to boot.

If you’re a collector of any sort (I’m not talking fancy collecting, but more stuff like comics, or action figures or something fun like that), you’ll find many, many things in New York City that you’ll want to spend your hard-earned cash on. You have no idea. Shopping for anything in this city is an activity that gets very addictive. It’s possible to find just about anything here.

What’re your specific likes/interests? It might be easier to point you in the right direction from there.

ps. Mike B! Fancy running into you here. I see you often on faeriedragon and on lisa’s blog.

Sam | 9 Dec 2002
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Help Matt plan a vacation in New York City

anil dash’s daily links | 5 Dec 2002